Agenda

Sept 17th, 2015

07:00pm

 

Public Lecture and Reception
Festive Hall of the Austrian Academy of Sciences
"How new genomic technologies will impact us all" by George Church

 

Followed by a discussion moderated by Esther Dyson
with Sharon Terry, Christiane Druml, Markus Müller, M.D.

 

 

 

 

 

Sept 18th, 2015

08:30am

 

Registration

 

 

 

09:00am

 

Opening Remarks
Giulio Superti-Furga

 

 

 

09:15am

 

Session I: Populations
Chair: Sir John Chisholm, Genomics England

Within a few years millions of people will have their genomic data. Multiple countries have embarked on large initiatives aiming to advance precision medicine and the health of their populations. What are the opportunities to realize social benefits that exceed these enormous investments?

 

 

 

12:00pm

 

Break
Networking and Lunch

 

 

 

01:30pm

 

Session II: Environments
Chair: Tim Spector, UK Twin Registry

Human traits and diseases emerge from a complex interplay of genomes and the environment. Large-scale cohort studies have been instrumental for understanding how environmental exposures such as diet, physical activity, and smoking influence our health. New tools for measuring microbiomes, epigenomes and metabolomes are contributing to new insights about environmental components of human health. What approaches can help us measure important environmental influences of human health so as to maximize the impact of large-scale population genome sequencing and precision medicine initiatives?

 

 

 

03:00pm

 

Break

 

 

 

03:30pm

 

Special Sessions
Flash Talks -- 8th floor seminar room

 

 

 

06:00pm

 

Wrap-up

 

 

 

 

 

Sept 19th, 2015

09:00am

 

Session III: Traits
Chair: Joseph Kvedar, Center for Connected Health

DNA sequencing technologies have revolutionized our ability to measure the molecular basis of life. But when it comes to traits, even the pioneers of the Personal Genome Project still have to fill out lengthy, old-fashioned questionnaires?! What does technology have to offer for improved measurement? And how can we use these tools to facilitate research, healthy living, better medicine?

 

 

 

10:30am

 

Break

 

 

 

10:45am

 

Session IV: Society
Chair: Barbara Prainsack, King's College

What does it mean for society when genomic information becomes more broadly available? Which societal trends influence how genomic information is going to be used (or not used) in medicine and beyond? Are there any general lessons to be learned about the relationship between societal developments and technology-driven advances in biomedicine?

 

 

 

12:15pm

 

Lunch

 

 

 

1:15pm

 

Vignette: Sarah Gray

 

 

 

1:30pm

 

Session V: Technology
Chair: George Church, Harvard

New technologies are the most important driver of biomedical research and precision medicine. We are currently harvesting the fruits of investments into DNA sequencing technology and IT infrastructure that were initiated 1-2 decades ago. Which prompts the question: Which technologies being developed today do you think are most promising, in need of further investment, such that we are able to reap their benefits for personal health, medicine and society ~10 years from now?

 

 

 

03:30pm

 

Special Sessions

 

 

 

05:00pm

 

Adjourn

 

Agenda as a PDF

 

*Agenda is subject to change